Exercise and Aging: What You Need to Know to Stay Young and Healthy

Exercise,  Blood Sugar, Aging, and Health 

The clock ticks for all men and women, and with each tick comes change. For those who manage to avoid major medical problems, the changes are slow and gradual, but they do add up. Here are some things that aging can do to you — if you give up and let Time take his toll.

Sugar is controversial now, yet lots of people stand by it. "What is the big deal?" they say. As with epidemiology it is always difficult to prove direct effects in humans. People are complicated, they have different genes, different lifestyle habits. Some smoke, some run marathons, some live in cities with smog, some are in the country by animal waste. All this makes it difficult to find a direct effect between nutrition and health.

In the case of blood sugar, we need to look at what we know about how the body works. First, when blood sugar is high your pancreas releases insulin so the excess sugar (glucose) can be absorbed by fat cells in your body.  Conversely, when your blood sugar is low, the pancreas releases glucagon which signals the liver to release glucose in the blood.

Both insulin and glucagen are hormonal signals, which send messages to your body. They are bound to have more than one function, and indeed as we have seen earlier, insluin is also important in making you feel hungry. This is part of the reason why a person usually feels hungry after eating high sugar foods. 

So how does all this relate to health and aging? Well first off, if your blood sugar is consistently high from eating high sugar foods then your body eventually becomes less and less responsive to the insulin, precipitating a condition known as type II diabetes.

Further, caloric restriction is probably the most famous intervention known to extend healthy years of life and "preserve youth". While it is still not known how caloric restriction does this, one of the main theories is that by starving the body, insulin sensitivity increases. In other words, it takes less insulin to keep blood sugar in line, and this in turn slows down the aging of your body. Could you ask for a better reason to eat lettuce instead of candy?

Some of the changes of aging start as early as the third decade of life. After age 25–30, for example, the average man’s maximum attainable heart rate declines by about one beat per minute, per year, and his heart’s peak capacity to pump blood drifts down by 5%–10% per decade. 


That’s why a healthy 25-year-old heart can pump 2½ quarts of oxygen a minute, but a 65-year-old heart can’t get above 1½ quarts, and an 80-year-old heart can pump only about a quart, even if it’s disease-free.

In everyday terms, this diminished aerobic capacity can produce fatigue and breathlessness with modest daily activities.

Starting in middle age, blood vessels begin to stiffen and his blood pressure often creeps up as well. His blood itself changes, becoming more viscous (thicker and stickier) and harder to pump through the body, even though the number of oxygen-carrying red blood cells declines.

In other words: pay attention now!

Do you Usually Feel Tired? Dry Skin? Trouble Losing Weight? You Likely Have THIS Deficiency


Most Americans begin to gain weight in midlife, putting on 3–4 pounds a year. But since men start to lose muscle in their 40s, that extra weight is all fat. This extra fat contributes to a rise inLDL (“bad”) cholesterol and a fall in HDL ("good”) cholesterol. It also helps explain why blood sugar levels rise by about 6 points per decade, making type 2 diabetes distressingly common in senior citizens.

"Most people's health deteriorate as they age, starting when you reach 45 years old. There is a good chance you or someone you love is feeling the affects of aging, which can include low energy, memory loss, weight gain, sagging skin & wrinkly skin or heart issues.

When you watch this FREE presentation you will discover a nutrient that researchers believe can help in improving many of the most common ailments related to aging - which, by-the-way, the Big Drug Companies would rather you didn't see."

The Room Is Spinning
Feeling dizzy or shaky can be a sign of low blood sugar or hypoglycemia. Because your brain needs glucose to function, a drop in blood sugar can be dangerous — even life-threatening — if you don’t address it.

Your Hands and Feet Swell
If you have high blood pressure as well as high blood sugar, the two conditions can damage the kidneys’ ability to filter wastes and fluid over time. As water builds up in your body, your hands and feet may swell — a warning sign that you may have kidney disease. You can preserve the kidney function you have by taking by improving your blood sugar levels. 


Are you always hungry? Have you gained weight despite cutting calories? Or, do you frequently experience stomach problems? If you answered “yes” to any of these questions, you could be experiencing high blood sugar symptoms.

Want To Learn More about Blood Glucose Control? - See Video Below


What are the causes of high blood sugar symptoms?

There are a number of different factors that contribute to high blood sugar symptoms including:

  • Poor diet
  • Lack of regular exercise
  • Stress
  • Certain health conditions
  • Use of certain medications

What are the high blood sugar symptoms?

Having high blood sugar does not automatically mean you have diabetes. High blood sugar is only a symptom of diabetes. In fact, an individual experiencing hyperglycemia (high blood sugar) could have no symptoms at all. But, the most commonly-experienced high blood sugar symptoms include:

  • Always being hungry
  • Frequent urination and/or urination during the night
  • Dry and itchy skin
  • Daily fatigue or extreme tiredness
  • Increased thirst
  • Dry mouth
  • Difficulty concentrating
  • Excess abdominal fat/weight gain
  • Recurrent infections
  • Blurred vision
  • Impotence
  • Slow healing of cuts and wounds
  • Nerve problems
  • Stomach problems

Whether you are looking to lose weight, trying to reverse high blood sugar symptoms, or you are seeking an overall healthful eating plan, focusing on blood sugar is a good starting place to achieve your goals.


It’s never too late

Aging is inevitable, but it has an undeservedly fearsome reputation. No man can stop the clock, but most can slow its tick and enjoy life as they age with grace and vigor. Jonathan Swift was right when he said, “Every man desires to live long, but no man would be old.” Regular exercise, along with a good diet, good medical care, good genes, and a bit of luck, can make it happen.

Most people’s health deteriorate as they age, starting when you reach 45 years old. There is a good chance you or someone you love is feeling the affects of aging, which can include low energy, memory loss, weight gain, sagging & wrinkly skin or heart issues.

When you watch this FREE presentation you will discover a nutrient that researchers believe can help in improving many of the most common ailments related to aging – which, by-the-way, the Big Drug Companies would rather you didn’t see.

Learn More about Blood Glucose Control - Video

Copyright © 2016 healthfactsreport.com | Privacy Policy

Share Post
Share Post

This is the bottom slider area. You can edit this text and also insert any element here. This is a good place if you want to put an opt-in form or a scarcity countdown.